A wonderful, typography-filled performance of “Peter and the Wolf”

This was just what I needed on this rainy quarantine day. From the always awesome The Kid Should See This:

In 2014, Camera Lucida and Radio France teamed up to create a series of classical music-filled apps for children. One of these shared Sergei Prokofiev’s Pierre et le loup in a typography-filled adaptation by Gordon (Thierry Guernet), Pierre-Emmanuel Lyet, and Corentin Leconte. It’s a stunning version that mixes animation, musical symbols, and musicians, featuring the National Orchestra of France, conducted by the maestro Daniele Gatti.

Don’t let the name fool you, The Kid Should See This has plenty of wonderful stuff that adults will enjoy, too.

Movies and Documentaries for Creatives

Most everyone is (hopefully) staying at home much more these days. But, even if you are working from home, you probably have more free time on your hands. Netflix and Prime Video offer a multitude of mindless distraction, but why not watch something that could improve your art or inspire your next masterpiece?

The Pixel Surplus blog has put together a list of the “27 Best Movies & Documentaries For Creatives”, and while it does contain some fairly well-known choices, there are several on the list that I, personally was previously unaware of.

So, pop some corn, fire up the smart TV or laptop and widen your design horizons.

The Evolution of the American One Dollar Bill

I have always been interested in the design of paper money. The craftsmanship and artistry that goes into banknote design is admirable, and the anti-counterfeiting features are interesting to learn about. If you know anything about paper money around the world, you will be aware that U.S. currency is quite drab and dated compared to some. This short video traces the history of the American dollar bill, and shows that although it has always been something of a design trainwreck, it has shown occasional bursts of beauty (and a surprising amount of color) at times. The backs of the bills hold particular interest for me, because it seems like there is where the most interesting stuff happens, design-wise.

As interesting as this may be, there are many countries whose banknotes are far more colorful and stylish. Makes me wonder why the U.S. can’t, or won’t, change.