Hating Comic Sans Is Ableist

I, personally, don’t really have a problem with Comic Sans, per se. My problem is when it is used inappropriately, as any font can be used inappropriately. But this story, by Lauren Hudgins, really got me thinking about fonts, in general, and Comic Sans, in particular, in a different way.

It is the story of Hudgins’ sister, Jessica. Jessica is dyslexic, and reading materials using Comic Sans is one of the ways she copes with this disability. It turns out that the irregular shapes of the characters in Comic Sans make it uniquely suited for use by dyslexics, as it is easier to distinguish individual letters and parts of words.

The irregular shapes of the letters in Comic Sans allow her to focus on the individual parts of words. While many fonts use repeated shapes to create different letters, such as a “p” rotated to made a “q,” Comic Sans uses few repeated shapes, creating distinct letters (although it does have a mirrored “b” and “d”). Comic Sans is one of a few typefaces recommended by influential organizations like the British Dyslexia Association and theDyslexia Association of Ireland. Using Comic Sans has made it possible for Jessica to complete a rigorous program in marine zoology at Bangor University in Wales.

From The Establishment (via Metafilter).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *